Santa Monica Observer - Community, Diversity, Sustainability and other Overused Words

By David Ganezer
Observer Staff Writer 

The Russians Love Their Children Too: Sting Releases New Version on Youtube

"To the Ukrainians fighting this tyranny, and also to the many Russians protesting this outrage despite the threat of arrest and imprisonment. We all of us love our children"

 

"In light of one man's woefully misguided decision to invade a peaceful unthreatening neighbor. To the Ukranians fighting this tyranny, and also to the many Russians protesting this outrage despite the threat of arrest and imprisonment. We all of us love our children. The Russians too.

British singer Gordon Sumner (aka Sting) has re-released "The Russians Love Their Children Too" to highlight Russia's invasion of Ukraine. At the beginning, he receives this preface:

"I've only rarely sung this song in the many years since it was written, because I never thought it would be relevant again. But In light of one man's woefully misguided decision to invade a peaceful unthreatening neighbor, I sing it again. To the Ukrainians fighting this tyranny, and also to the many Russians protesting this outrage despite the threat of arrest and imprisonment. We all of us love our children. The Russians too."

Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner CBE (born 2 October 1951), known as Sting, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor. He was the frontman, songwriter and bassist for new wave rock band the Police from 1977 to 1984. He launched a solo career in 1985 and has included elements of rock, jazz, reggae, classical, new-age and worldbeat in his music.

As a solo musician and a member of the Police, Sting has received 17 Grammy Awards. "Russians" is a song by Sting, from his debut solo album, The Dream of the Blue Turtles, released in June 1985, and released as a single in November. The song is a commentary and plea that criticises the then-dominant Cold War foreign policy and doctrine of mutual assured destruction (MAD) by the United States and the then existing Soviet Union.

The song uses the Romance theme from the Lieutenant Kijé Suite by Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev, and its lead-in includes a snippet from the Soviet news program Vremya in which the famed Soviet news broadcaster Igor Kirillov says in Russian: "...The British Prime Minister described the talks with the head of the delegation, Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev, as a constructive, realistic, practical and friendly exchange of opinions...", referring to the meeting of Mikhail Gorbachev and Margaret Thatcher in 1984. The Soviet leader at the time was Konstantin Chernenko.

Also in the background, communications from the Apollo–Soyuz mission can be heard.

In a 2021 interview, James Cameron, the co-writer, director and producer of Terminator 2, said that the song inspired him to create the character of John Connor, the 10-year-old boy who would be the central character of the plot: "I remember sitting there once, high on E, writing notes for Terminator, and I was struck by Sting’s song, that “I hope the Russians love their children too.” And I thought, “You know what? The idea of a nuclear war is just so antithetical to life itself.” That’s where the kid came from."

 

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